Cassandra Clare’s The Bane Chronicles

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2.0 Stars

This was a courtesy rating because Magnus Bane is a great character and there were two short stories in this book that I enjoyed, the rest just sucked. I have a love/hate relationship with Cassandra Clare. Some of her books are actually good (personal favorite is The Infernal Devices series) and some are just garbage that she seems to be producing to squeeze every last penny out of the Mortal Instruments series and the Shadowhunter universe. That being said, one of my favorite characters that she has ever created is Magnus Bane. Magnus Bane is a biracial (Asian and white), bisexual warlock. He is incredibly stylish and his personality is amusing. A writer can do a lot with a character such as him, especially when this character is an immortal warlock. So how could this book be so bad?

The book is comprised of eleven short stories that take place throughout the eternal life of Magnus, so the time periods and countries change with each new tale. In some of the stories, you run into characters from other Cassandra Clare books which is cool for her fans. Some of the stories read like fan fiction, which probably has to do with Clare not being the only writer in this collection (featured authors: Sarah Rees Brennan, Maureen Johnson, and illustrator Cassandra Jean). Due to its fan fiction vibe, this book gives me a familiar feeling. It reminds me of when I go to a convention and the overwhelming awkwardness of my fellow nerds makes me wince in second-hand embarrassment.

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The collection of short stories features artwork by Cassandra Jean at the beginning of each story accompanied by a notable quote from the story itself. I thought it was a nice touch.

On a completely different note, there’s a line in the book that bothers me, “And it was nice to see a neighborhood where not everyone had white skin.” It is confusing to me that this sentence was put here because in all of Clare’s work there is a serious lack of minorities as main characters. Supporting characters, there are a few sprinkled in, which is great but never the main character. She also makes a point to describe these characters as being “stark white” or extremely pale all the time. Why pretend? Magnus Bane is the closest thing to a diverse main character and now that he gets his own book it’s utter shit.

I paired this collection with Forager Brewery‘s Untitled Art. because if Magnus Bane was a craft beer he would be this. It pours a dark burgundy/purple color which I thought was appropriate for Magnus. The bottle is also very pretty. It is a blackberry Berliner Weisse, a bit tart and incredibly enjoyable.

Quotes:

“Trust. It is like placing a blade in someone’s hand and setting the very point to your heart.”

“Love did not overcome everything. Love did not always endure. All you had could be taken away, love could be the last thing you had, and then love could be taken too.”

“One can give up many things for love, but should not give up oneself.”

Format: Hardcover.

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Road Trip: Wild Iris Bookstore

2/3rds of us recently went on a road trip to visit Wild Iris Books, Florida’s only Feminist + LGBTQ bookstore located in Gainesville, Florida. It was a great experience and the people who work and own the bookstore are super knowledgeable. If you ever get a chance, you guys should check it out.

“Established in 1992, Wild Iris Books is Florida’s only feminist bookstore. Celebrating an inventory and event schedule that lifts up feminism, we have been a strong part of the activist community for many years. Check out our in-store stock of women’s studies, minority and civil rights studies, queer and trans resources, alternative children’s books, alternative spiritualities and healing modalities and more.”

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Julia Serano’s Whipping Girl: A Transsexual Woman on Sexism and the Scapegoating of Femininity

IMG_20160711_1219105.0 Stars

Serrano’s Whipping Girl is a very personalized and informative discussion on gender identity. Serrano explains the language of gender and the many factors that make up our expectations of gender. Serrano goes into length about femininity, trans-misogyny, and sexism. She explores what it means to be a transwoman and how they are treated. Her knowledge coupled with her clear writing style makes this book an enjoyable read. It is the best educational text for trans-allies or anyone hoping to learn a little more about the people around them. At times, I found all the new language overwhelming. It makes me a little nervous thinking and learning about these issues as a trans-ally. If it’s so confusing for me, how do I advocate effectively for the community that I support? So much about the LGBTQ is based on ignorance and misunderstanding. The ongoing battle to change or enlighten people’s pre-established biases is frustrating.

Quotes: “It is no longer enough for feminism to fight solely for the rights of those born female.”
“And while we credit previous feminist movements for helping to create a society where most sensible people would agree with the statement ‘Women and men are equals,’ we lament the fact that we remain light-years away from being able to say that most people believe that femininity is masculinity’s equal.”

I’m pairing this book with Goose Island’s saison, Sofie. I love saisons and this style alesofie drinks pleasingly when reading a book that will leave you feeling confused but informed. Oh, the things you didn’t know you didn’t know. Let your beer be a comfort to you as you try to sort out cissexuals, oppositional sexism, traditional sexism, gender hierarchies and femininity in feminism. Good luck!

Beer Photo Credit: Beer Metal Dude
Format: Paperback.